Thursday, February 28, 2013

dot-ed:

astronomy-to-zoology:

Whale Evolution, From Pakicetus to Dorudon

video source.

Wednesday, February 27, 2013
nprfreshair:

Geoff Nunberg looks at how the language of the past is used and abused in the pop culture of the present:

Spotting linguistic anachronisms in Julian Fellowes’ Downton Abbey is as easy as shooting grouse in a barrel. “I couldn’t care less,” Lord Grantham says. Thomas complains that “our lot always gets shafted.” Cousin Matthew announces he’s been on a steep learning curve, a phrase that would have been gotten a blank reception even in the Sterling Cooper boardroom.

Disclaimer: the above are not direct Downton Abbey quotes.
Image via Telegrams from Downton

I hadn’t thought of this. 
- Dom

nprfreshair:

Geoff Nunberg looks at how the language of the past is used and abused in the pop culture of the present:

Spotting linguistic anachronisms in Julian Fellowes’ Downton Abbey is as easy as shooting grouse in a barrel. “I couldn’t care less,” Lord Grantham says. Thomas complains that “our lot always gets shafted.” Cousin Matthew announces he’s been on a steep learning curve, a phrase that would have been gotten a blank reception even in the Sterling Cooper boardroom.

Disclaimer: the above are not direct Downton Abbey quotes.


Image via Telegrams from Downton

I hadn’t thought of this. 

- Dom

nprfreshair:

Yes. Good morning.
Smithsonian Magazine has an interview with “The Man Behind The Best Nature GIFs On Tumblr”. In other words this guy:
headlikeanorange:

A mountain gorilla (Africa - BBC)


Wow. I can’t stop staring at this. 
- Dom

nprfreshair:

Yes. Good morning.

Smithsonian Magazine has an interview with “The Man Behind The Best Nature GIFs On Tumblr”. In other words this guy:

headlikeanorange:

A mountain gorilla (Africa - BBC)

Wow. I can’t stop staring at this. 

- Dom

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

nprfreshair:

Geoff Nunberg on the linguistic anachronisms of Downton Abbey:

No, Mrs. Patmore probably wouldn’t have said “when push comes to shove,” and Lord Grantham should have waited a couple of decades before telling his chauffer to step on it. But that isn’t the problem with Downton’s vision of the past. Even when the characters are speaking authentic period words, they aren’t using them to express authentic period thoughts. The Earl who frets over his duties as a job creator, the servants grappling with their own homophobia — those are comfortable modern reveries. Drop any of them into a drawing-room comedy by Shaw or Pinero and they’d be as out-of-place as a flat-screen TV.

Downton Abbey Anachronism Watch via @Slate

lovingold:

“Front porch of two-family tobacco shack, 1964.” Paul Kwilecki, from the Paul Kwilecki Photographs Collection at Duke University. Kwilecki photographed Bainbridge and Decatur County from 1960 to 2001.

lovingold:

“Front porch of two-family tobacco shack, 1964.” Paul Kwilecki, from the Paul Kwilecki Photographs Collection at Duke University. Kwilecki photographed Bainbridge and Decatur County from 1960 to 2001.

shutterfinger:

we went in, climbed up and looked out

Great shots!

- Dom

life:

Happy birthday, Johnny Cash.
To celebrate, look back at these one of a kind portraits made for a November 1969 LIFE feature.
(Michael Rougier—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

life:

Happy birthday, Johnny Cash.

To celebrate, look back at these one of a kind portraits made for a November 1969 LIFE feature.

(Michael Rougier—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

Learn Japanese Online
Lesson 1 - Introductions and Greetings

This is Japanese I, Lesson 1 of GPB’s  Irasshai series. The topics covered are self introductions, first-time greetings and addressing people by name. Cultural topics include Japanese names and meishi. 

- Dom

Learn Japanese Online

Lesson 1 - Introductions and Greetings

This is Japanese I, Lesson 1 of GPB’s  Irasshai series. The topics covered are self introductions, first-time greetings and addressing people by name. Cultural topics include Japanese names and meishi. 

- Dom

African Roots: Trickster stories
Click here for Georgia Stories’ African Roots. 

In the 1800s when there was no television to watch, movies to see, or video games to play people had other ways to entertain themselves. African slaves brought with them a strong oral tradition of storytelling, especially trickster tales, and told them in the evenings when the work was done. In trickster tales, the smaller and weaker character always manages to get the better of his larger, stronger protagonist by using his wits.
— Georgia Stories

Image: Screen cap via Georgia Stories
- Dom

African Roots: Trickster stories

Click here for Georgia Stories’ African Roots. 

In the 1800s when there was no television to watch, movies to see, or video games to play people had other ways to entertain themselves. African slaves brought with them a strong oral tradition of storytelling, especially trickster tales, and told them in the evenings when the work was done. In trickster tales, the smaller and weaker character always manages to get the better of his larger, stronger protagonist by using his wits.

— Georgia Stories

Image: Screen cap via Georgia Stories

- Dom

nprfreshair:

Michael Moss tells Dave Davies about Coke’s marketing strategy:

Within Coke they referred to their best customers not as you might think, ‘consumers’ or ‘loyal fans’ or something like that. They became known as ‘heavy users.’ And Coke had a formula … that basically said, ‘20 percent of the people will use 80 percent of the product’ and, as Coke saw it, it was worth their while more to focus on those 20 percent using 80 percent of the product than to try to generate more consumption by the other 80 percent. So the heavy users of soda became those people who were drinking as many as 1000 cans of soda a year sometimes even more.

Image via kpishdadi/Flickr

nprfreshair:

Michael Moss tells Dave Davies about Coke’s marketing strategy:

Within Coke they referred to their best customers not as you might think, ‘consumers’ or ‘loyal fans’ or something like that. They became known as ‘heavy users.’ And Coke had a formula … that basically said, ‘20 percent of the people will use 80 percent of the product’ and, as Coke saw it, it was worth their while more to focus on those 20 percent using 80 percent of the product than to try to generate more consumption by the other 80 percent. So the heavy users of soda became those people who were drinking as many as 1000 cans of soda a year sometimes even more.

Image via kpishdadi/Flickr